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COLORADO
 

JUVENILE LAW CLINIC
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO LAW SCHOOL
2450 Kittredge Loop Road
Boulder, Colorado 80309
Telephone:       (303) 492 8047
Fax:                 (303) 492-4587
Website:          www.colorado.edu/law/clinics/jlc

 

100% Children’s Law
Does Not Use Volunteer Attorneys

 

The Juvenile Law Clinic (JLC) provides legal services for indigent children, youth, and families, in four metro counties. Children and families facing abuse, poverty, homelessness, and despair are among the neediest members of our community requiring quality legal representation. Student attorneys in the JLC meet that need. JLC clients are predominantly children and youth in the child welfare system, or the juvenile justice system. Student attorneys also defend parents in child welfare cases, grandparents seeking adoptions, and school districts trying to intervene to save the educations of at-risk students. The clinic accepts calls from the public and from children.

 

 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF COUNSEL FOR CHILDREN
13123 E. 16th Ave., B390
Aurora, CO 80045
Telephone:       (303)864-5324
                        (888) 828-NACC
Fax:                 (303) 864-5351
Email:              advocate@naccchildlaw.org
Website:          www.NACCchildlaw.org

 

The National Association of Counsel for Children (NACC) is a non-profit organization founded in 1977 to enhance the well-being of children by promoting excellence in the field of children’s law. NACC is a membership organization which works to improve the legal protection and representation of children throughout the United States and abroad. The NACC provides training and technical assistance to attorneys and other professionals, serves as a public information and professional referral center, and engages in public policy advocacy to improve the system. Training sessions are held throughout the country.

NACC membership is multidisciplinary and includes attorneys, judges, medical and mental health professionals, social workers, teachers, law enforcement officials, guardians ad litem, court appointed special advocates and other individuals who care about children. NACC maintains a membership Deskbook & Directory which contains NACC organizational information, a membership directory, a referral network of child advocates and other resources. It is provided to all members as a benefit of membership, which costs $75 annually.

 

NACC has numerous publications, including Child Welfare Law and Practice and other books, a quarterly newsletter of cases, brief articles, news of conferences and other information related to the practice of children’s law, and the quarterly journal, Children’s Legal Rights Journal. The Guardian is a forum through which members share case law, referrals, strategic approaches, and other resources to promote effective representation of children in need of protection. Each year NACC holds a major national conference devoted to children’s legal issues. NACC also produces a children’s law manual in conjunction with each year’s conference.

 

NACC also works to educate legislators and their staff members about measures that would assist children in need of protection. While NACC does not provide any direct legal representation, in recent years, it has filed amicus Curiae Briefs in the U.S. Supreme Court, state appellate and state supreme courts.

 

 

OFFICE OF THE CHILD’S REPRESENTATIVE
1300 Broadway, Suite 320
Denver, CO 80203
Telephone:       (303) 860-1517
Website:          http://www.coloradochildrep.org/

 

The Office of the Child’s Representative (OCR) is the state agency mandated to provide competent and effective best interests legal representation to children involved in the Colorado court system. OCR was created by the General Assembly in 2000 to improve representation for Colorado’s most vulnerable children by establishing minimum practice standards and providing litigation support, accessible high-quality statewide training, and oversight of the practice. The OCR oversees attorneys that provide legal representation as guardians ad litem (GAL), counsel for children in dependency and neglect proceedings, child legal representatives (CLR), as well as attorneys appointed to serve as state-paid Child and Family Investigators (CFI).

 

OCR attorneys represent the interests of children in dependency and neglect (child abuse), delinquency, domestic relations, adoption, truancy, probate, mental health, and paternity cases. The attorney’s responsibilities are dependent upon the case type in which the attorney is appointed and the role the attorney serves in that case. An attorney appointed as GAL and CLR must independently investigate, make recommendations that are in the best interests of the child, and advocate on that child’s behalf. An attorney appointed as counsel for children in dependency and neglect proceedings is limited to direct representation in contempt proceedings and/or involving therapeutic privilege issues. Attorneys appointed as state-paid CFIs must independently investigate the matter and report to the court. OCR trains all of its attorneys on the law, social science research, child development, mental health and education issues, and best practices relating to issues impacting children involved in court proceedings.

 

 

ROCKY MOUNTAIN CHILDREN’S LAW CENTER
1325 S. Colorado Blvd., Ste. 308
Denver, CO 80222
Telephone:       (303) 692-1165
Fax:                 (303) 302-2890
Website:          www.rockymountainchildrenslawcenter.org

 

100% Children’s Law
Does Use Volunteer Attorneys

 

The Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center began as a federal demonstration project running from 1981 to 1984. It is now a non-profit organization using lawyers and other professionals to represent poor children in Colorado. Clients are referred from many sources, including the media and general public. Volunteers are recruited through local bar associations, law schools and law firms, as well as seminars and newsletters. Extremely active in training, the Center co-sponsors a major annual conference and at least four other training sessions for which CLE credit is available. The Center uses multidisciplinary pro bono teams, including social workers, health care professionals, child development specialists and psychologists, who meet to staff cases and provide consultation to attorneys.